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Word of the month – August 2012 August 11, 2012

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in·dom·i·ta·ble/inˈdämitəbəl/

Adjective:
Impossible to subdue or defeat: “indomitable spirit”.
 
Synonyms:
invincible – tameless
 

Word of the Month – July 2012 July 11, 2012

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per·spi·cac·i·ty  (pûrsp-ks-t)

n.

Acuteness of perception, discernment, or understanding.
THESAURUS
Noun 1. perspicacity - intelligence manifested by being astute (as in business dealings)perspicacity– intelligence manifested by being astute (as in business dealings)

business enterprise, commercial enterprise, business – the activity of providing goods and services involving financial and commercial and industrial aspects; “computers are now widely used in business”
intelligence – the ability to comprehend; to understand and profit from experience
craftiness, cunning, foxiness, guile, slyness, wiliness, craft – shrewdness as demonstrated by being skilled in deception
insightfulness, acumen – shrewdness shown by keen insight
knowingness – shrewdness demonstrated by knowledge
street smarts – a shrewd ability to survive in a dangerous urban environment
2. perspicacity– the capacity to assess situations or circumstances shrewdly and to draw sound conclusions

trait – a distinguishing feature of your personal nature
objectiveness, objectivity – judgment based on observable phenomena and uninfluenced by emotions or personal prejudices
subjectiveness, subjectivity – judgment based on individual personal impressions and feelings and opinions rather than external facts
 

Word of the Month – June 2012 June 11, 2012

Filed under: Palabra del Mes,Uncategorized,Vocabulario Inglés,Word of the month — profesoraingles @ 11:19 am

sa·gac·i·ty/səˈgasitē/

Noun:
The quality of being sagacious: “a man of great political sagacity”.
Synonyms:
wisdom – acumen – shrewdness – perspicacity – cleverness
 

ESSAYS – Linking Words May 5, 2012

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Linking words help you to connect ideas and sentences, so that people can follow your ideas.

Giving examples
For example

For instance

Namely

The most common way of giving examples is by using for example or for instance.
Namely refers to something by name.
“There are two problems: namely, the expense and the time.”

Adding information

And

In addition

As well as

Also

Too

Furthermore

Moreover

Apart from

In addition to

Besides

Ideas are often linked by and. In a list, you put a comma between each item, but not before and.
“We discussed training, education and the budget.”

Also is used to add an extra idea or emphasis. “We also spoke about marketing.”
You can use also with not only to give emphasis.
“We are concerned not only by the costs, but also by the competition.”
We don’t usually start a sentence with also. If you want to start a sentence with a phrase that means also, you can use In addition, or In addition to this…

As well as can be used at the beginning or the middle of a sentence.
“As well as the costs, we are concerned by the competition.”
“We are interested in costs as well as the competition.”
Too goes either at the end of the sentence, or after the subject and means as well.
“They were concerned too.”
“I, too, was concerned.”

Apart from and besides are often used to mean as well as, or in addition to.
“Apart from Rover, we are the largest sports car manufacturer.”
“Besides Rover, we are the largest sports car manufacturer.”
Moreover and furthermore add extra information to the point you are making.
“Marketing plans give us an idea of the potential market. Moreover, they tell us about the competition.”

Summarising

In short

In brief

In summary

To summarise

In a nutshell

To conclude

In conclusion

We normally use these words at the beginning of the sentence to give a summary of what we have said or written.

Sequencing ideas


The former, … the latter

Firstly, secondly, finally

The first point is

Lastly

The following

The former and the latter are useful when you want to refer to one of two points.
”Marketing and finance are both covered in the course. The former is studied in the first term and the latter is studied in the final term.”

Firstly, … secondly, … finally (or lastly) are useful ways to list ideas.
It’s rare to use “fourthly”, or “fifthly”. Instead, try the first point, the second point, the third point and so on.
The following is a good way of starting a list.
“The following people have been chosen to go on the training course: N Peters, C Jones and A Owen.”

Giving a reason


Due to / due to the fact that

Owing to / owing to the fact that

Because

Because of

Since
As
Due to and owing to must be followed by a noun.

“Due to the rise in oil prices, the inflation rate rose by 1.25%.”
“Owing to the demand, we are unable to supply all items within 2 weeks.”
If you want to follow these words with a clause (a subject, verb and object), you must follow the words with the fact that.
“Due to the fact that oil prices have risen, the inflation rate has gone up by 1%25.”
“Owing to the fact that the workers have gone on strike, the company has been unable to fulfil all its orders.”
Because / because of
Because of is followed by a noun.
“Because of bad weather, the football match was postponed.”
Because can be used at the beginning or in the middle of a sentence. For example, “Because it was raining, the match was postponed.”
“We believe in incentive schemes, because we want our employees to be more productive.”
Since / as
Since and as mean because.
“Since the company is expanding, we need to hire more staff.”
“As the company is expanding, we need to hire more staff.”

Giving a result

Therefore

So

Consequently

This means that

As a result
Therefore, so, consequently and as a result are all used in a similar way.
“The company are expanding. Therefore / So / Consequently / As a result, they are taking on extra staff.”
So is more informal.

Contrasting ideas

But

However

Although / even though

Despite / despite the fact that

In spite of / in spite of the fact that

Nevertheless

Nonetheless

While

Whereas

Unlike

In theory… in practice…

But is more informal than however. It is not normally used at the beginning of a sentence.
“He works hard, but he doesn’t earn much.”
”He works hard. However, he doesn’t earn much.”
Although, despite and in spite of introduce an idea of contrast. With these words, you must have two halves of a sentence.
“Although it was cold, she went out in shorts.”
”In spite of the cold, she went out in shorts.”
Despite and in spite of are used in the same way as due to and owing to. They must be followed by a noun. If you want to follow them with a noun and a verb, you must use the fact that.
“Despite the fact that the company was doing badly, they took on extra employees.”
Nevertheless and nonetheless mean in spite of that or anyway.
“The sea was cold, but he went swimming nevertheless.” (In spite of the fact that it was cold.)
”The company is doing well. Nonetheless, they aren’t going to expand this year.”
While, whereas and unlike are used to show how two things are different from each other.
“While my sister has blue eyes, mine are brown.”
“Taxes have gone up, whereas social security contributions have gone down.”
“Unlike in the UK, the USA has cheap petrol.”
In theory… in practice… show an unexpected result.
“In theory, teachers should prepare for lessons, but in practice, they often don’t have enough time.”

 

 

Sample Essay Questions

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Sample Essay Questions
Common strategy terms for Essay writing are as follows:

Analyze: Divide an event, idea, or theory into its component elements, and examine each one in turn: Analyze Milton Friedman’s theory of permanent income.

Compare and/or Contrast: Demonstrate similarities or dissimilarities between two or more events or topics: Compare the portrayal of women in Beloved with that in Their Eyes Were Watching God.

Define: Identify and state the essential traits or characteristics of something, differentiating it clearly from other things: Define Hegelian dialectic.

Describe: Tell about an event, person, or process in detail, creating a clear and vivid image of it: Describe the dress of a knight.

Evaluate: Assess the value or significance of the topic: Evaluate the contribution of black musicians to the development of an American musical tradition.

Explain: Make a topic as clear and understandable as possible by offering reasons, examples, and so on: Explain the functioning of the circulatory system.

Summarize: State the major points concisely and comprehensively: Summarize the major arguments against using animals in laboratory research.
Following are some sample essay questions:

Education comes not from books but from practical experience.
Write a unified essay in which you perform the following tasks. Explain what you think the above statement means. Describe a specific situation in which books might educate students better than practical experience. Discuss what you think determines when practical experience provides a better education than books do.

Scientific inquiry is rooted in the desire to discover, but there is no discovery so important that in its pursuit a threat to human life can be tolerated.
Write a unified essay in which you perform the following tasks. Explain what you think the above statements means. Describe a specific situation in which a threat to human life might be tolerated in the pursuit of scientific discovery. Discuss what you think determines when the pursuit of scientific discovery is more important than the protection of human life.

Politicians too often base their decisions on what will please the voters, not on what is best for the country.
Write a unified essay in which you perform the following tasks. Explain what you think the above statement means. Describe a specific situation in which a politician might make an unpopular decision for the good of the country. Discuss the principles you think should determine whether political decisions should be made to please the voters or to serve the nation

An understanding of the past is necessary for solving the problems of the present.
Write a unified essay in which you perform the following tasks. Explain what you think the above statement means. Describe a specific situation in which solving a current problem might not require an understanding of the past. Discuss what you think determines whether or not the past should be considered in solving the problems of the present.

Wealthy politicians cannot offer fair representation to all the people.
Write a unified essay in which you perform the following tasks. Explain what you think the above statement means. Describe a specific situation in which a wealthy politician might offer fair representation to all people. Discuss what you think determines whether a wealthy politician can or cannot offer fair representation to all the people.

In a free society, laws must be subject to change.
Write a unified essay in which you perform the following tasks. Explain what you think the above statement means. Describe a specific situation in which a law should not be subject to change in a free society. Discuss what you think determines whether or not a law in a free society should be subject to change.

 

 

tips for essay writing

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Tips for essay writing
Research
Before you begin writing your essay, look through the marking criteria
in your unit information. Also check your study guide for information
relevant to your topic.
Now, develop your own interpretation of the question. You can make
sure you’re on the right track by running it by a friend or other
students online.
Pre-writing and further research
•       Brainstorm ideas about your topic
•       Write down the who, what, when, where, why and how
•       Draw diagrams or a checklist of the ideas raised by your essay
topic
•       Research – focus on information that will improve your
understanding of the key points
•       Organise your notes into the main points of your essay
•       Plan your response by ordering your arguments, developing your
explanations and identifying the strongest supporting evidence
Essay structure
Introduction:
•       Clarify your point of view
•       Outline essay structure
•       Explain importance of topic
•       Define key terms
•       Explain main points
Body:
•       Stick to one idea per paragraph
•       Include supporting evidence and examples
•       Order your points according to importance
Conclusion:
•       Summarise your main points
•       State your argument
•       Never introduce new ideas in the conclusion – however you can,
include further questions raised by your essay
Final revision and editing
You need to show you understand the topic. Ensure that your arguments
are well developed, your points are clearly expressed and your
evidence ‘stacks up’.
Check:
•       Have you referenced accurately and provided a bibliography?
•       Is your writing tight and persuasive?
•       Is your essay thorough and complete?
Proof your final copy
Before submitting your essay, check your spelling and grammar and make
sure you have answered the question.

 

Word of the month ~ palindrome February 23, 2010

Filed under: Palabra del Mes,Word of the month — profesoraingles @ 8:24 am

A palindrome:
The word palindrome is from the Greek palíndromos, meaning running back again (palín = AGAIN + drom-, drameîn = RUN). A palindrome is a word or phrase which reads the same in both directions. Some simple examples are:
RACECAR DEED LEVEL PIP ROTOR CIVIC POP MADAM EYE NUN RADAR TOOT

The longest single English word in common usage which is a palindrome is REDIVIDER, although the contrived chemical term DETARTRATED is two letters longer.

A heteronym that is spelt the same as another word both forward and backwards.

source: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Definition_of_words_that_are_spelled_the_same_forward_and_backward